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The DOT Doctor:
Clean and Green Technologies

Being Clean and Green does not have to be complex.  Simple starts such as idle reduction through generators (apu) installed on your trucks, Prepass to reduce congestion and other such measures is one easy way to take a step towards being earth friendly.

Make your workplace environmentally friendly by setting up a "Smoke Free Workplace".  Reduce your individual carbon footprint while helping others.  Each small step we take together helps us all.

        Re-doing your network?  Let us help you spec the new equipment.  The DOT Doctor can show you how to choose the most energy efficient computer network.  We can show you how to reduce your carbon footprint of your company.  Recycle those old computers the most "Earth Friendly" way.  Is your office lighting earth friendly?  We can help!  

Remember....."The earth does not belong to us, we borrow it from our grandchildren." - Native American saying.

 

Contact the DOT Doctor for ways to "green" your business.  We offer simply "baby step" plans to quick turn arounds for a complete green workplace.

     Environmental Sustainability

This "Thinking Green, Cost-Efficiently" white paper addresses environmental issues being faced by shippers today.

Expanded emissions model encourages "green" decision making for shippers  Many shippers assume that implementing environmentally-sensitive practices will strike a blow to their bottom line. Fortunately, that's not the case. Shippers now can offset an environmental impact and still meet their cost, service, and capacity goals by understanding the environmental effects of their shipping activities and measuring their environmental footprint.

 


 

Dr. Andrea Sitler PhD is a published author and SME in the fields of transportation, logistics and safety. 

  "PU: Energy Source or Death Source" discusses the advantages of Nuclear Energy vs. conventional energy methods.  Understand this value element and its benefits to the environment.  The health risks, terrorist potential and proper handling of Plutonium are discussed in detail. 

The transport and handling of high level hazardous material, especially nuclear waste, is covered in detail.  An in-depth discussion on the benefits and ability to recycle Pu vs. bury Pu at Yucca Mountain is explored.   Learn how Pu is recycled around the globe.  Realize that only 3% is ACTUAL waste.

Radiation exposure in everyday life as well as the cancer risks of Pu exposure is explored.  Dr. Cohen’s work is referenced and discussed.   Understand the government controls on the nuclear industry and remove public fears.  Learn how Yucca Mountain will be filled before it is even officially opened.

Learn how the nuclear industry is the cure to Global Warming.  Explore the current state of the nuclear industry and nuclear energy is covered as well as the history of nuclear technology.  Learn about breeding Pu, purity factors, risk factors and global developments.  Compare and contrast the US Nuclear Market vs. the Global Nuclear Market.  Discover India’s Nuclear Power Strategy, CANDU Reactor and Reactor developments and advancements. 

For a limited time - only $7.77 through this SPECIAL Offer

Instant download upon confirmed payment via PayPal.

Use Order Form for other payment methods or order from Amazon.com via the link to the right.

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Yale Environment 360: The news last week that summer ice covering the Arctic Ocean was tied for the second-lowest extent on record is a sobering reminder that the planet is swiftly heading toward a largely ice-free Arctic in the warmer months, possibly as early as 2020. Peter Wadhams, professor emeritus of ocean physics at Cambridge University, is a sea ice specialist with 46 years of research on sea ice and ocean processes in the Arctic and Antarctic. In more than 50 expeditions to both polar regions, he has worked...
Climate News Network: More than half of all the world’s maize crops and around a third of all wheat and rice will be grown in regions vulnerable to climate change in the next 50 to 100 years, according to new research. At the same time, the world’s population will grow to 9 billion, and global food production will need to rise by from 60% to 110% by 2050 to keep up with demand. Such changes will inevitably hit the poorest nations hardest, and will put at hazard the planet’s remaining wilderness areas and the surviving...
Scientific American: Astonishment was universal last December when the Paris Agreement on climate change included the aspiration to limit warming to 1.5° C above pre-industrial levels, a much tougher target than the standard of 2°, now seen as too risky. It was a remarkable triumph for a long campaign by the small island states, proving that even tiny nations with a powerful moral case can change the world. But what does a global aim of 1.5° mean? Is it achievable? How much difference would it make? A conference at...
Associated Press: Baby lobsters might not be able to survive in the ocean's waters if the ocean continues to warm at the expected rate. That is the key finding of a study performed by scientists in Maine, the state most closely associated with lobster. The scientists, who are affiliated with the University of Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, said the discovery could mean bad news for the future of one of America's most beloved seafood treats, as well as the industry lobsters...
Guardian: When South Africa’s government started giving laptops to off-grid schools, James van der Walt spotted an opportunity for a solar business. But his market research revealed a problem: of 12 schools he visited, 11 had previously lost solar panels to thieves. So he decided to pack his system into a reinforced shipping container, creating a secure, mobile power station that could be shut away at the end of each day. The prototype Solar Turtle has survived its first year powering a school in the Eastern...
CNBC: The challenges posed by climate change could be solved by humans living on other planets, Gary Johnson, the Libertarian presidential candidate and former governor of New Mexico, has told ABC News. "We do have to inhabit other planets. The future of the human race is space exploration," he told the broadcaster in an interview late Sunday. Johnson was asked about a comment made back in 2011 where he said that "in billions of years the sun is going to actually grow and encompass the earth." Johnson...
Blasting News: Gary Johnson, the Libertarian Party candidate, was being interviewed on “This Week” on ABC when the question was put to him about #Climate Change, the theory that human use of fossil fuels in pumping greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere is raising the temperature of the Earth. Johnson offered an unusual policy prescription for the problem, according to the Washington Examiner. He said "we do have to inhabit other planets. The future of the human race is #Space exploration.” Space exploration and...
Reuters: Ninety percent of carbon dioxide emissions by major advanced economies is not priced at a level that truly reflects the actual cost to the climate, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) said in a report on Monday. A price on carbon is considered an effective tool in curbing greenhouse gases by making polluters pay for emissions blamed for causing global warming. But worldwide, carbon prices are very low, or even zero. "New evidence presented...shows that 90 percent of...
PV Tech: The International Finance Corporation (IFC) and the Canadian government have partnered up to finance Jordan’s latest US$76 million solar plant. The 50MW PV plant is to be built by FRV, part of Abdul Latif Jameel Energy (ALJ), and will constitute the first solar power plant in Mafraq. According to the IFC, the plant will supply power at US$0.069/kWh; a price far below Jordan’s average cost of electricity and among the lowest for solar worldwide. The plant is scheduled to be operational by 2018 and...
Mother Nature Network: As our planet and our oceans warm, the habits and habitats of marine wildlife change, too. Fish, sharks and crustaceans that are normally found within a certain temperature range are forced to pack up and move. Why is that a big deal? Lots of reasons. In Maine, for example, lobster fishing is a $495 million a year industry. But fisherman are catching fewer lobsters (millions of pounds less each year), and the population is expected to continue to decline as these crustaceans migrate toward the cooler...
Agence France-Presse: A snow-covered former US army base in Greenland -- dubbed "a city under ice" -- could leak pollutants into the environment as the climate changes, raising difficult questions over who is responsible for a clean-up. In 1959, US army engineers began constructing a futuristic project in northwestern Greenland that might as well have been lifted from a Cold War spy movie. A network of tunnels under the snow contained everything from research facilities to a hospital, a cinema and a church -- all powered...
Yahoo!: Prime Minister Narendra Modi said India will ratify the Paris Agreement climate change pact on Oct 2. Modi’s announcement on Sunday is seen as a major boost to the implementation of measures at international level in an attempt to control global warming. Modi added that the country has chosen Oct. 2 to coincide with the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, who lived his entire live with minimum carbon footprint. "There is one work left in the CoP21 (Conference of Parties). Ratification is yet...
Guardian: A new book by Michael Mann and Tom Toles takes a fresh look on the effects humans are having on our climate and the additional impacts on our politics. While there have been countless books about climate change over the past two decades, this one – entitled The Madhouse Effect - distinguishes itself by its clear and straightforward science mixed with clever and sometimes comedic presentation. In approximately 150 pages, this books deals with the basic science and the denial industry, which has...
Guardian: In the coming weeks, the Paris climate agreement could be about to enter into force. Action to meet the deal’s targets of holding global warming to 2C is most clearly visible in the energy sector - where a low-carbon transition is underway. There is, however, one sector where, until now, action has been invisible owing to its exemption from contributing to the fight to limit carbon pollution: international aviation. Aviation is one of the top-10 global carbon polluters. The industry emits more...
Guardian: The Labour party has strengthened its opposition to fracking, saying it would ban the controversial technique for extracting shale gas if it came to power. Speaking at the Labour conference in Liverpool, shadow energy and climate secretary Barry Gardiner is to announce the party will be going further than its previous policy of a moratorium until environment conditions are met. The stance leaves the party even more strongly opposed to fracking than the Scottish government, which has a moratorium...
RTS: Borneo is a large island that is home to one of the most uniquely valuable forests in the world, with a biodiversity every bit as rich as that of Amazonia. But this very richness has long since aroused the interest of big forest companies. Since the 1960s, the island has lost half of its forests. Whether it is caused by clear-cut logging, palm-oil cultivation or mining, deforestation is an ever-increasing scourge for the natural environment. In recent years, Borneo’s forest dwellers themselves have...
Bloomberg: In low brown-brick buildings near the University of Michigan, 350 workers test the emissions on 400 vehicles a year, tearing them apart as needed. Their tools detect pollutants like nitrogen oxide at 100 parts per billion. In a hangar-size garage, they chain 80,000-pound freight trucks in place and spin their wheels at 90 miles an hour, measuring the exhaust. Welcome to the hive of Chris Grundler--environmental sleuth, bureaucrat and more-than-occasional bane of the auto industry. As head of...
Newsweek: Thirty-one countries formally ratified the Paris climate change agreement at the U.N. on Wednesday. The major diplomatic move significantly increases the prospects that the landmark global warming treaty will now come into effect soon, possibly before the end of the year. For this to happen, at least 55 countries accounting for a minimum of 55 percent of global emissions must deposit their instruments of ratification with the U.N. With Wednesday’s breakthrough, 60 countries accounting for 47.7...
IANS: US President Barack Obama and Oscar-winning actor Leonardo DiCaprio will discuss ways to combat climate change at a White House event next week. At the inaugural South by South Lawn: A White House Festival of Ideas, Art, and Action, they will take part in a conversion with climate scientist Dr. Katharine Hayhoe about "the importance of protecting the one planet we've got for future generations", reports hollywoodreporter.com. Afterwards, DiCaprio's new climate documentary Before the Flood will...
Nature World: Alert! The melting sea ice in the Arctic is leaving polar bear hungry and their population dwindling in numbers. According to a report from Earth Sky, polar bears have taken the most drastic hit from the melting Arctic sea ice due to climate change. Polar bears mainly get their fat and nutrients from eating seals, and the ice in the Arctic has greatly helped the slow-moving bears to catch the much-faster seals by ambushing the latter through the ice. However, as the Arctic sea ice continues...
Australian Broadcasting Corporation: A survey of more than 2,000 Australians by the Climate Institute has found 77 per cent believe climate change is occurring and 90 per cent believe the Federal Government has a responsibility to drive action on it. Key points: Results strongest in years 'due to public being able to witness changing temperatures, weather' Survey found 3pc of people supported coal power, 59pc supported solar energy SA electricity price spike 'exposed need for climate change, energy policies' The research...
Mashable: Australians overwhelmingly believe in climate change, according to a new poll, and they are more than ready for the government to do something about it. According to The Climate Institute's 2016 Climate of the Nation report, 77 percent of Australians believe climate change is happening. That number has grown year on year in the annual report since 2012, when only 64 percent believed in the phenomenon. Of this group, 90 percent feel human activity is at least partly the cause. SEE ALSO: 375...
Climate News Network: China is protecting itself against future food supply problems caused by climate change by buying or leasing large tracts of land in Africa and South America, a leading UK climate scientist says. Professor Peter Wadhams, an expert on the disappearing Arctic ice, says that while countries in North America and Europe are ignoring the threat that changing weather patterns are causing to the world food supply, China is taking “self-protective action”. He says that changes in the jet stream caused by...
Blue and Green: On Tuesday 27th September, ethane from US fracking will arrive in Scotland for the first time. Campaigners from both continents attacked bosses at INEOS for their financial gain from the destructive shale gas extraction in Pennsylvania. Almost 10,000 gas wells have been drilled in Pennsylvania, with a devastating effect on local communities and the environment. One of the companies supplying INEOS with ethane from the Marcellus shale, Range Resources, has been fined millions of dollars for environmental...
Guardian: Residents of central western New South Wales should expect “a long flood” over the next few weeks. The Lachlan river reached 10.65m at Forbes overnight, surpassing the 1990s floods, but the worst was predicted to hit next week. The Bureau of Meteorology predicts a second, higher peak next week near Condobolin and Euabalong. “This will be a rolling cycle of flooding through communities in the central west part of that state as rain comes in again later this week,” the State Emergency Service acting...
Agence France-Presse: India, the world's third largest greenhouse gas emitter, will ratify the Paris climate change pact next month, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Sunday (Sep 25), bringing the deal a step closer to reality. Modi said India will formally join the landmark accord struck in 2015 in Paris, through which countries commit to take action to stem the planet's rising temperatures. The accord needs ratification from 55 countries that account for at least 55 percent of the planet's greenhouse gas emissions...
Associated Press: India’s prime minister said on Sunday that his country will ratify the Paris Agreement on climate change early next month. Prime Minister Narendra Modi said his government will ratify the agreement Oct. 2, coinciding with the birth anniversary of India’s independence leader Mohandas Gandhi, who believed in a minimum carbon footprint. Modi made the announcement at a meeting of his Bharatiya Janata Party’s leaders in the southern Indian town of Kozhikode. India accounts for around 4.5 percent...
Guardian: Huge spikes in wholesale electricity prices in South Australia in July show stable, nationally consistent climate policy must urgently replace “unmanageable uncertainty” for energy market investors, according to a new analysis by the Grattan Institute. When the short-term spot price of electricity spiked to its peak of $14,000 several times on 7 July, some commentators sought to blame the high share of wind power in the state. Energy experts argued the price spikes were a result of an abuse of...
Guardian: Public support for Australia to be a world leader in climate change solutions has rebounded to its highest since the major political parties agreed on emissions trading, research shows. About 65% of the nation want to see Australia lead the world in solutions, an increase from 52% in 2010-12 when the “carbon tax” debate was front and centre in politics. The annual attitudinal study by the Climate Institute shows this year’s jump, up from 59% in 2014-15. It’s the closest it has been to the...
Guardian: BP’s publicly available plans to drill for oil in the Great Australian Bight don’t give a clear indication of where it would get all the people, boats and aircraft needed to contain a major oil spill in the remote waters 300km off the coast of South Australia, according to the Wilderness Society. BP says it is confident its plans “are appropriate” but says “the regulator will ultimately determine if this is the case”. BP has proposed to drill for oil inside a commonwealth marine reserve. Its...
Rawstory: Libertarian Party presidential nominee Gary Johnson suggested on Sunday that climate change could not be stopped and that the solution was for the human race to "inhabit other planets." During an interview on ABC`s This Week, host George Stephanopoulos reminded Johnson that he had warned in 2011 that global warming was "in our future" because the sun would eventually "grow and encompass the Earth." "Does that mean we don`t do anything about it now?" Stephanopoulos wondered. "No, come on,"...
National Observer: Time is running out for the federal government to decide on whether to approve the Pacific NorthWest LNG project, which could open the way for one of the largest infrastructure investments in Canadian history. The legislated deadline for a decision on the Petronas-led, $36-billion liquefied natural gas project on British Columbia's north coast is Oct. 2, following numerous delays in the review process including a three-month extension earlier this year. The project has drawn intense scrutiny,...
India TV: Backing India’s attempt to ratify the key Paris Climate Change agreement, the US today congratulated Prime Minister Narendra Modi for taking a step in this direction. “We welcome the news that India will join the #ParisAgreement October 2,” US Ambassador to India Richard Verma said. “Congrats Prime Minister @narendramodi for your leadership to #ActOnClimate,” Verma tweeted. Earlier, in a surprise move, Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that India will ratify the Paris Climate Change...
Deutsche-Welle: India, the world's third-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, will ratify the Paris agreement on climate change in October, the country's prime minister has said. The US and China have already signed up to the deal. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi confirmed Sunday that his country would ratify the Paris agreement on climate change on October 2, coinciding with the anniversary of the birth of Mohandas Gandhi, the South Asian nation's independence leader. "Now the time has come to ratify...
Christian Science Monitor: On Sunday, the Paris climate accord inched ever-closer to fruition with India’s support. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has said that India will ratify the agreement on Oct. 2 – Mohandas Gandhi's birthday. The deal, which must be ratified by 55 UN member nations accounting for 55 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions before going into effect, has been hailed as a turning point in international climate change policy. At last count, some 60 countries representing 48 percent of emissions had...
Financial Times: Four of the world’s largest fund houses have been accused of playing “games” with their investors after failing to back motions that sought greater climate change disclosure at ExxonMobil and Chevron. BlackRock, Invesco, BNY Mellon and Vanguard all voted against an investor-led climate change resolution at the annual meetings of the two US oil companies in May, according to data shared exclusively with FTfm by Fund Votes, a project that tracks proxy voting. Aberdeen, the UK-listed fund house, voted...
Gizmodo: Libertarian nominee for president Gary Johnson got a lot of heat recently for comments he made in 2011 about not having to worry about climate change because the sun was eventually going to destroy Earth anyway. So Johnson went on ABC’s This Week today to tell everyone to lighten up and explain his real solution for climate change: moving to other planets. “Can’t we have a little humor once in a while?” Johnson told George Stephanopoulos when asked about his 2011 comments regarding the inevitable...
Guardian: The Dutch parliament has voted for a 55% cut in CO2 emissions by 2030, which would require the closure of all the country’s coal-fired power plants. The unexpected vote on Thursday night by 77 to 72 would bring the Netherlands clearly into line with the Paris climate agreement, with some of the most ambitious climate policies in Europe. It is not binding on the government, but the Liberal and Labour parties say they will now push for speedy implementation of the motion. Five Dutch coal-fired...
Guardian: Australia’s education department paid Bjørn Lomborg’s Copenhagen Consensus Centre $640,000 to help produce a report that claimed limiting world temperature increases to 2C was a “poor” use of money. The $640,000 cost, incurred before the CCC’s controversial $4m Australian program was junked, is revealed in the 2016 incoming ministerial brief published under freedom of information laws. An education department spokeswoman told Guardian Australia the $640,000 represented the Australian government...
ScienceDaily: New research shows that human pollution of the atmosphere with acid is now almost back to the level that it was before the pollution started with industrialisation in the 1930s. The results come from studies of the Greenland ice sheet and are published in the scientific journal, Environmental Science and Technology. The Greenland ice sheet is a unique archive of the climate and atmospheric composition far back in time. The ice sheet is made up of snow that falls and never melts, but rather remains...
Sydney Morning Herald: Public support for world-leading, federal government-level action on climate change has bounced back, according to a new poll, as people perceive environmental impacts around them and support a larger role for renewable energy production. According to the Climate Institute's Climate of the Nation poll, 65 per cent of Australians want their country to lead the world on finding solutions, a significant increase since the time of divisive debates about the Gillard government's carbon tax. The...
Reuters: India, the world's third-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, will formally join the Paris agreement on climate change on Oct. 2, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Sunday. The ratification by India, which follows that of the United States and China, the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitters, will help accelerate the enactment of the landmark Paris agreement on climate change forged last December. "Now the time has come to ratify the COP21 protocol. India will do it on Gandhi Jayanti, on...
Reuters: Half of Paris' streets and avenues were car-free on Sunday as part of Mayor Anne Hidalgo's fight against air pollution, allowing families and tourists to wander on the roads around landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower and Champs-Elysees. The car ban covered a larger part of the city than last year's event, closing off more than 650 km (400 miles) of roads in the French capital and offering attractions such as skating sessions and a picnic on the banks of the Seine near city hall. For Socialist mayor...
Indian Express: In an announcement which will cheer the global community, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday announced that India would ratify COP21 Paris agreement on climate change, which binds each country to cut down on carbon emissions. The announcement also came just a day before External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj is to address the United Nation General Assembly where she is all set to make a forceful argument to isolate countries sponsoring and exporting terrorism. "I want to make an announcement...
India TV: Prime Minister Narendra Modi today announced that India will ratify the Paris Climate Change agreement on October 2, a move that that will give momentum to implementation of measures at international level to control global warming. "There is one work left in the CoP21 (Conference of Parties). Ratification is yet to be done and India too is yet to do it. Today on the birth anniversary of Deen Dayal Upadhyay, I announce that India will ratify the decisions on October 2, the birth anniversary of...
Daily Express: Toxic algae that first turned up in the York River in 2007 hasn't merely taken hold - its bloom has exploded this summer in the Chesapeake Bay and beyond, expanding farther and lasting longer than scientists have ever seen before. Water samples taken this summer show the algae, called Alexandrium monilatum, has spread from Virginia Beach to the James, York and Rappahannock rivers to the Eastern Shore. One marine expert suspects it has even reached as far north as the Potomac River. Scientists...
CNN: It's a tense waiting game for people facing flood threats from swollen rivers and creeks in parts of Iowa and Wisconsin. Flooding already claimed two lives this week in western Wisconsin's Vernon County. One man was killed Thursday after a mudslide destroyed his home, according to CNN affiliate WEAU-TV. A second man died Thursday while trying to drive through floodwaters near his home, the station reported.In Iowa, people are waiting for the Cedar River to breach its banks. In Cedar Rapids, the...
Guardian: Eyebrows would be raised if American crocodiles, found on the southern tip of Florida, decided to relocate to New York's Fifth Avenue or Moroccan camels suddenly joined the tourist throng outside Buckingham Palace in London. Yet this is the scale of species shift that appears to be under way in Alaska. In July, researchers in Cape Krusenstern national monument on the north-west coast of Alaska were startled to discover a nest containing Caspian terns on the gravely beach of a lagoon. The birds...
Times of India: India will ratify the Paris Agreement on climate change+ on October 2 - the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi. The country's move will bring this global deal to fight the menace of global warming+ closer to enter into force later this year. The big announcement was made by the Prime Minister Narendra Modi during his speech at the BJP party council meet+ in Kozhikode on Sunday. India had, in fact, announced its 'climate action plan' (to fight the challenges of climate change) on October 2...
Standard: Munacho Nyamayedenga (61) says he has never been formally employed but still managed to look after his family through subsistence farming in the rocky and arid region of Uzumba-Maramba-Pfungwe (UMP). Nyamayedenga says he has managed to see all his six children through school from agriculture, but laments that last year's El Niño-induced drought and "soil tiredness" brought new challenges that have left most people in the community in need of food aid. With the country faced with a La Nina phenomenon...
Financial Times: Five of the world’s largest fund houses have been accused of playing “games” with their investors after failing to back motions that sought greater climate change disclosure at ExxonMobil and Chevron. BlackRock, Invesco, Aberdeen, BNY Mellon and Vanguard all voted against an investor-led climate change resolution at the annual meetings of the two US oil companies in May, according to data shared exclusively with FTfm by Fund Votes, a project that tracks proxy voting. The investment houses backed...
CounterCurrents: Most Americans live far from the path of the Dakota Access pipeline-they won't be able to visit the encampments on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation where representatives of more than 200 tribes have come together in the most dramatic show of force of this environmental moment. They won't be able to participate in the daily nonviolent battle along the Missouri River against a $3.7 billion infrastructure project that threatens precious water and myriad sacred sites, not to mention the planet's unraveling...
National Geographic: As currently proposed, the Dakota Access pipeline would move oil out of northwestern North Dakota, through a 30-inch pipe, and along a 1,200-mile path that cuts through both Dakotas, Iowa, and a stretch of Illinois before meeting another pipeline in the town of Patoka. It would carry nearly half a million barrels of domestic sweet crude oil every day, and the project's builder, Energy Transfer Partners, says it will bring back money. The Texas-based company says the pipeline will create up to...
Climate News Network: The world of the polar bear is shrinking – everywhere. New research by scientists in the US confirms that each of the 19 known populations of Ursus maritimus is increasingly affected by the earlier sea ice melt in the Arctic spring, and the later arrival of ice every autumn. The finding is hardly a shock, as there have been warnings from conservationists about such things for years, with the polar bear becoming an icon of climate change concerns. And in most cases of species threat there are winners...
Guardian: Hopes that large amounts of planet-warming carbon dioxide could be buried in soils appear to be grossly misplaced, with new research finding that the ground will soak up far less carbon over the coming century than previously thought. Radiocarbon dating of soils, when combined with previous models of carbon uptake, has shown the widely assumed potential for carbon sequestration to combat climate change has been overestimated by as much as 40%. Scientists from the University of California, Irvine...
Yahoo: The U.S. oil and gas industry is having a visible effect on the Earth's surface, a new review of satellite images has found. In recent years, energy companies have pumped an unprecedented volume of wastewater — a byproduct of fracking and conventional drilling — deep into underground wells. The water often can't be reused or recycled for economic or technical reasons, so many companies have found it easier to inject the water back into the ground. That process has sparked a wave of earthquakes...
ScienceDaily: Many of the tourists now flocking to see Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are hoping to 'see it before it's gone' -- in the latest example of what's come to be known as 'Last Chance Tourism (LCT)'. Annah Piggott-McKellar and Karen McNamara from the University of Queensland (Australia) explain the concept of 'LCT' in the current issue of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism. They write: "LCT is a niche tourism market focused on witnessing and experiencing a place before it disappears. This tourism...
Science: During the past decade or so the oil and gas industry has injected wastewater into deep rocks in eastern Texas, causing Earth’s surface to bulge ever so slightly—and likely triggering a series of tremors there in 2012, a new study suggests. Scientists say the work offers hope that similar analyses of the landscape in other oil- and gas-producing regions could help identify areas at risk of human-caused earthquakes. The 2012 quakes shook the small town of Timpson, Texas, which lies northeast of...
Science Blog: A new paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research shows that sea level rise in the northern Indian Ocean rose twice as fast as the global average since 2003. This represents a stark contrast to the previous decade, when the region experienced very little sea level rise at all. The science team led by Philip Thompson, associate director of the University of Hawai‘i Sea Level Center in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), analyzed two and a half decades of ocean surface...
Engadget: Despite some scary evidence that climate change is affecting weather patterns and even shifting how the Earth moves, 43 percent of Americans wouldn't spend a buck a month to fight it. With Congressional deadlock standing in the way of a national strategy to combat it, the White House has launched its own endeavor to find solutions. In typical Obama fashion, it involves making government data public. The Partnership for Resilience and Preparedness (PREP) will give organizations access to troves of...
Mongabay: The International Criminal Court (ICC), housed at The Hague in the Netherlands, has mostly focused on human rights abuses and war crimes committed during armed conflicts throughout its 14-year history. But the court has now signaled that it will begin investigating crimes such as land grabbing, environmental destruction, and forced evictions that are often committed during peacetime in the pursuit of profit. In a detailed policy paper on case selection and prioritization released last week, ICC...
Reuters: Native American tribes took their fight to Washington on Thursday to stop development of a $3.7 billion oil pipeline, as Democrats in the U.S. Congress urged the federal government to scrap construction permits and reconsider the project. Representative Raul Grijalva, the senior Democrat on the House of Representatives Natural Resources Committee, called on the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers "to withdraw the existing permits for Dakota Access pipeline." He said the agency should then initiate...
Financial Express: Scientists have tripled the known types of viruses -- identifying over 15,000 distinct ones -- living in the world`s oceans, an advance that may be key to the efforts to protect the planet from global warming. Greenhouse gases threatening the environment could be mediated by these viruses through manipulation by scientists -- something that is at least a couple decades off, but will likely be necessary to manage climate change, researchers said. The study, led by Ohio State University in the...
TomDispatch: Cowboys and Indians are at it again. Americans who don't live in the West may think that the historic clash of Native Americans and pioneering settlers is long past because the Indians were, after all, defeated and now drive cars, watch television, and shop at Walmart. Not so. That classic American narrative is back big time, only the Indians are now the good guys and the cowboys--well, their right-wing representatives, anyway--are on the warpath, trying to grab 640 million acres of public...
Climate Home: Strolling through the small town of Lamu, the main town on an island of the same name surrounded by a coral-rich archipelago off Kenya’s east coast, visitors are mesmerised by its classical architecture and pristine beaches, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. What they might not notice is how the beautiful landscape has been, and still is, shaped by one plant family that could soon disappear from the island altogether: mangroves. This is not only bad news for the locals, but also a step...
Climate Central: On Wednesday, President Obama took another step toward securing his climate legacy. This time his focus wasn't on energy, public lands or international diplomacy. It was on national security and making sure the U.S. military is prepared for a more unstable future. The White House published a presidential memorandum setting up a timetable for more than 20 federal agencies to come up with a plan to put climate science into action when it comes to national security. "It's not a new direction,...
Reuters: Aboriginal tribes from Canada and the northern United States signed a treaty on Thursday to jointly fight proposals to build more pipelines to carry crude from Alberta`s oil sands, saying further development would damage the environment. The move came as Native American tribes on Thursday took their fight to Washington to stop development of the $ 3.7 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline, which would cross federally managed and private lands in North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois. Last...
PhysOrg: Recently the team discovered that two distantly related tree species use the same genes to adapt to the range of temperatures in their geographical region. Their results were published Thursday in the journal Science. Jason Holliday, an associate professor of forest resources and environmental conservation in the College of Natural Resources and Environment and a Fralin Life Science Institute affiliate, as well as Haktan Suren, a Ph.D. candidate from the same department in the Genetics, Bioinformatics...
Washington Post: Rapidly melting Greenland may be shedding its ice even faster than anyone suspected, new research suggests. A study just out in the journal Science Advances finds that previous studies may have underestimated the current rate of mass loss on the Greenland ice sheet by about 20 billion tons per year. Generally, scientists estimate ice loss in Greenland (and elsewhere around the world) using data from satellites. But the new study suggests these satellite studies may have included some incorrect...
New York Times: It is an improbable journey that begins on the highest peaks of the Tianshan Mountains, where glacial snowmelt descends across one of the world’s most arid landscapes to reach the lush oasis communities of this ancient Silk Road outpost. Powered by gravity, the water — pure and cold — makes the entire voyage underground, traveling through scores of subterranean channels, some of them 15 miles long and 100 feet deep, that were built 2,000 years ago by the pastoralists who settled this inhospitable...
New York Times: More than 20 world leaders tendered legal documents on Wednesday, formally binding their governments to the Paris climate accord at a General Assembly ceremony here and all but ensuring that the agreement will go into force by the end of the year. The specifics of each country’s plans, though, are voluntary. There are no sanctions for failing to control pollution or to put economic polices into practice, or for submitting unambitious pledges. The legally binding portion of the Paris accord...
Press Trust of India: Greenland lost nearly 2,700 gigatonnes of ice from 2003-2013, 7.6 per cent more than previously thought, a new study has found. According to researchers from Ohio State University in the US, the hotspot that feeds Iceland’s active volcanoes has softened the mantle rock beneath Greenland in a way that ultimately distorted their calculations for ice loss in the Greenland ice sheet. This caused them to underestimate the melting by about 20 billion metric tonnes or 20 gigatonnes per year. That means...
Bloomberg: President Barack Obama is ordering 20 federal agencies with national security-related missions to consider the impact of climate change in their planning, amid warnings from scientists that rising temperatures could destabilize regions across the globe. In a memorandum signed Wednesday, Obama established a new panel to provide national security agencies with better data about the potential impacts of climate change. The expectation is that officials will integrate predictions of severe weather and...
Guardian: The worst global bleaching event on record could simply be the new normal, according to one of the foremost experts on coral reefs and their response to warming oceans. Mark Eakin, head of the Coral Reef Watch program at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has told the Guardian he was hopeful the current global bleaching event would end in 2017, but said it was possible it would just roll on, alternating between the northern and southern hemispheres as the seasons changed....
Guardian: The Paris climate agreement is on the brink of coming into force after 31 nations officially joined the landmark accord, with the United Nations secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, predicting it will be fully ratified by the end of the year. On Wednesday, 31 countries formally signed up to the Paris deal at the UN general assembly in New York. They include Brazil, the world’s seventh largest emitter of greenhouse gases, Mexico, Argentina and Sri Lanka. Oil-rich United Arab Emirates also ratified the...
VG News: American talk show host David Letterman, who is now helming a documentary series “Years of Living Dangerously” for National Geographic on climate change and solar energy, interviewed Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi for an episode. In the preview of the upcoming episode, Letterman says, “I am not nervous but very, very excited.” This is Modi’s third exclusive interview since assuming office; the two occasions being on Indian news channels — Times Now and CNN-News18. Though the Indian Prime Minister...
Ecologist: While the confrontation at Standing Rock has galvanized Indians and non-native supporters from across the continent, writes Stanley L. Cohen, it's but a symptom of a much deeper crises facing several million Indians holding on to endangered traditions and cultures that predate 'our' arrival by several thousand years. We may call Indian people sovereign. But it's all a grand, perverse lie. I'm not a North American Indian. But I was adopted by clan mothers of the Longhouse Bear Clan from Akwesasne...
Reuters: An agreement to fight global warming came one step closer to taking effect on Wednesday when dozens of countries deposited their ratification of the deal at the United Nations, taking the total to 60, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said. The deal, agreed by nearly 200 countries in Paris last December, needs ratification by at least 55 countries representing 55 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions to take effect. Ban said the 60 countries represented more than 47.5 percent. The United...
Reuters: An ambitious plan by the Sri Lankan government to outfit 100,000 homes with solar panels, to turn them into power producers for the national grid, may be too expensive for many families to afford, experts warn. Sri Lanka’s government this month launched a “battle for solar energy” that aims to add 220 megawatts of clean power to the country’s energy grid by 2020, or about 10 percent of the country’s current daily electricity demand. By 2025, the country hopes to boost its solar power output to...
Mother Jones: Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate for president, takes what he calls the "long-term view" of climate change. "In billions of years," he said in 2011, "the sun is going to actually grow and encompass the Earth, right? So global warming is in our future." The former New Mexico governor did acknowledge that humans are making the world warmer in the near term, too—but he doesn't think the government should do much about it. In the same speech, he denounced "cap-and-trade taxation," said we "should...
Environmental Leader: If nothing else, the Keystone XL Pipeline triggered a debate on just how safe it is to transport oil and natural gas by pipeline. If there is an accident, the damages can add up and it can be tough to clean up. That’s why the Native Americans in North Dakota are protesting the construction of a line there — one that they say has the potential to destroy their water quality. With nearly 300,000 miles of long distance transmission pipelines carrying natural gas and 171,000 miles of those pipes moving...
EcoWatch: The Indian state of Tamil Nadu is now home to the world's largest solar power plant, according to local reports. The massive, 648-megawatt array was officially linked to the grid after being hooked up to a 400-kilowatt substation, the operator Adani Green Energy Ltd announced Wednesday. The plant is spread across 2,500 acres in the town of Kamuthi in the Ramanathapuram district and will supply enough clean, green energy for 300,000 homes. The Deccan Chronicle reported that the $679 million...
CounterPunch: Earlier this month, Hurricane Hermine caused storm surges that flooded the Florida coast, killed one person, and knocked out power for hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses. This is the first hurricane to make landfall in Florida since 2005’s Category 3 Hurricane Wilma, but the Atlantic basin is no stranger to major storms. In fact, the Atlantic Ocean sees seven named storms per year now, up from an average of five just a few years ago. And storm intensity is increasing in the Pacific Ocean...
Newsweek: Nearly 400 global scientists have signed an open letter slamming Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for vowing to withdraw from the Paris climate accord, warning of dire consequences for the environment if he is elected. “A ‘Parexit’ would send a clear signal to the rest of the world: ‘The United States does not care about the global problem of human-caused climate change,’” the letter read. “The consequences of opting out of the global community would be severe and long-lasting--for...
La Rampa di Napoli: President Maithripala Sirisena handed over the instruments pertaining to entry into force of Paris Agreement on Climate Change to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today at the United Nations General Assembly. The so-called Paris Climate Change Agreement involves action that would limit warming to well below two degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial average. Sandalow added that while the agreement will not officially enter into force this week during the United Nations summit in NY, the fact...
La Rampa di Napoli: Only countries which have ratified the deal have a seat at the table in drafting the rules of how it will work in practice. He said European Union environment ministers will meet Friday to discuss a plan to ratify the agreement as a bloc, even though only a handful of the 28 member states have approved it domestically. Most worldwide treaties take years, sometimes decades or more, to formally take effect as each nation goes through its own domestic process of ratifying or otherwise formally joining...
Washington Post: Earlier this year, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump sparked the ire of scientists and climate activists when he vowed to “cancel the Paris climate agreement” once in office. Now, hundreds of U.S. scientists, including famed physicist Stephen Hawking, have addressed this threat in an open letter warning of the perils of such action. Signed by 375 members of the National Academy of Sciences, the letter explicitly refers to “the Republican nominee for President” and notes that “such a...
Financial Post: The debate around carbon pricing is definitely a live one in Canadian public policy right now. The federal government and most of the provinces, including the four largest, have either implemented or are committed to implementing some version of carbon pricing in the near future, with a First Ministers’ meeting on the subject expected this fall. Canada has signed on, under the Harper government, to an emissions-reduction target of 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. This is an ambitious and...
Blue and Green: Environmentalist film director Vivienne DeCourcy (DARE TO BE WILD) and Chelsea Flower Show gold medalist Mary Reynolds along with the woodland trust have come together to encourage everyone to plant one tree in their garden this Autumn/Winter to help reverse climate change. DARE TO BE WILD celebrates its UK Premiere tonight at London’s Notting Hill Gate Cinema and will be released in cinemas across the UK and Ireland from this Friday 23 September. After experiencing family tragedy, former US...
Blue and Green: Following a ceremony at the UN in New York today the Paris Agreement on Climate Change is due to become law as 60 countries worth 47.5% of global emissions complete their formal ascension to it and 13 others commit to doing so this year. You can see a map of who has completed the process here: parisagreementtracker.org For those committed to join this year, we stand at 97 countries, representing 67% of emissions. This assumes all EU countries ratify. See the scenario here. Today’s ceremony was...
AGU: The small town of Wye River, on the coast of Victoria in the southeast corner of Australia, suffered devastating forest fires in the summer of 2015. Wye River itself lost 98 homes -- one third of the town -- and a further 18 were lost in nearby Separation Creek. Over Christmas last year a desperate battle was fought to save the remainder of the town, successfully, but images of the aftermath remain horrifying: A well documented hazard in the aftermath of a large fire is the potential for increased...
Guardian: A coal-burning power station in Wales repeatedly violated pollution controls for nitrogen oxide emissions, the European court of justice (ECJ) in Luxembourg has ruled. It ordered the UK to pay the European commission’s legal costs after ruling that Aberthaw power station, near Barry in the Vale of Glamorgan, should not have been allowed to exceed specially negotiated pollution limits. The decision prompted calls from Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth for the power station to be shut permanently...
Guardian: Yesterday, 375 of the world’s top scientists, including 30 Nobel Prize winners, published an open letter regarding climate change. In the letter, the scientists report that the evidence is clear: humans are causing climate change. We are now observing climate change and its affect across the globe. The seas are rising, the oceans are warming, the lower atmosphere is warming, the land is warming, ice is melting, rainfall patterns are changing and the ocean is becoming more acidic. These facts are...
Reuters: Hundreds of top scientists warned on Tuesday against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's vow to pull the United States out of the Paris climate-warming accord if elected in November. The 375 members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, including 30 Nobel Prize winners, said in an open letter that a U.S. abandonment of the agreement would make it far harder to develop global strategies to lessen the impact of global warming. "Thus it is of great concern that the Republican nominee...
Reuters: Britain failed to respect European Union limits on nitrogen oxide emissions from a coal-fired power plant in Wales, the European Court of Justice said on Wednesday. The European Commission launched an inquiry in May 2012 into the environmental credentials of the Aberthaw plant and took Britain to court in March 2015. Britain can now expect a fine and will have to pay the Commission's legal costs. EU member states were required to reduce emissions from large combustion plants by the start of 2008,...
ClimateWire: Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton holds a millennial-focused speech in Philadelphia at Temple University on Monday. Photo courtesy of AP Images. Hillary Clinton is pointing to climate change as one reason for young voters to support her, hoping to soften the negative perceptions they have about her candidacy six weeks before the presidential election. Clinton sought to convince an audience yesterday at a Philadelphia event for millennials that she's serious about addressing issues...
Hill: The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is reportedly investigating oil giant Exxon Mobil Corp. over its policies regarding climate change and certain accounting methods. The probe focuses in part on how Exxon, the United States’ largest oil and natural gas company, factors the impact of climate change and related government policies on its business, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the inquiry. Officials also want to know why Exxon has not written...
Mashable: When it comes to Earth's climate, even the records themselves are breaking records now. Earth just experienced its hottest August on record, according to NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This means the planet has set a record warm monthly temperature record during every month for the past 16 consecutive months -- an unprecedented warm streak, according to NOAA. The year-to-date is also record warm, as was the June through August period, known as meteorological...
Ecologist: The clean-up after the February 2014 explosion at the world's only deep underground repository for nuclear waste in New Mexico, USA, is massively over budget, writes Jim Green - and full operations won't resume until at least 2021. The fundamental cause of the problems: high level radioactive waste, poor regulation, rigid deadlines and corporate profit make a dangerous mix. The facility was never designed to operate in a contaminated state. It was supposed to open clean and stay clean, but now...
ScienceDaily: In the fall of 2015, hazardous levels of smoke from agricultural fires blanketed much of Equatorial Asia. Schools and businesses closed, planes were grounded and tens of thousands sought medical treatment for respiratory illness. In a new study, Harvard University researchers and their colleagues estimate that the 2015 smoke event caused upwards of 100,000 deaths across Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. To mitigate the impact of future smoke events, the team developed a model framework which...

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